Archaeology Events

Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia series (December 2023 to June 2024)

Venue:
  • Hybrid Format
  • Seminar: Online
  • Workshop: Bangkok, Thailand (SPAFACON 2024)
Date (Tentative):
  • Dates:  December-June (5 days)
  • Actual dates: 7 December 2023 (online), 30 January 2024 (online), 20 February 2024 (online), 19 March 2024 (online), 14 June 2024 (on-site at SPAFACON2024, Bangkok, Thailand)
Language: English
Participants: The online seminar is open to everyone. Participants who will attend the entire online sessions and/or the on-site workshop will receive a certificate. They are also eligible to join the Workshop and Case Study Activity during SPAFACON 2024 in Bangkok, Thailand.
Target profession(s):
  1. Archaeology professionals and practitioners operating in Southeast Asia
  2. Archaeology education sector: faculty and students
  3. Government sector: Agencies dealing with archaeology and related aspects of cultural heritage
  4. Private and NGO sector: special interest groups, professional associations and other related organizations dealing with archaeology and heritage

For inquiries, please contact anne@seameo-spafa.org.

Pre-Session 5:

If you’re interested in learning more about ethics in the field of archaeology, SPAFA is offering an onsite workshop in conjunction with SPAFACON2024 at Amari Bangkok Hotel in Bangkok on June 14, 2024. You can register here: https://bit.ly/EthicsOnsiteWorkshop

Post Session 4 – RECAP:

The Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia Workshop’s Intellectual Property Session held on March 19, 2024, via Zoom was an extensive exploration of key issues surrounding intellectual property in archaeology. The session was structured to provide a holistic understanding of the challenges and ethical considerations faced by researchers in the field.

The session began with an introduction highlighting the importance of addressing intellectual property issues in archaeology, setting the stage for the subsequent discussions. A survey presentation offered valuable insights into the perspectives of respondents, revealing significant concerns about the ethical implications of commercial ventures, the ownership and repatriation of artefacts, and the prevalence of intellectual property disputes in archaeological work.

Following the survey presentation, three case studies were presented by panel members, Prof. Ben Marwick, Dr Noel Hidalgo Tan, and Prof. Phaik Yeong Cheah, each focusing on different aspects of intellectual property and ethical dilemmas in archaeology and research. Ben’s case study delved into artefact ownership, publication ethics, and data protection, sparking discussions on co-authorship criteria, export regulations, and open data publication. Noel’s case study explored regulatory compliance, ethical conduct, and the role of state authority in overseeing archaeological research, prompting reflections on ethical considerations as well as open data publication and protection. Phaik Yeong’s case study examined community engagement, data sharing, and preferential access to research data, leading to discussions on informed consent, indigenous rights, and collaborative research agreements.

The subsequent question and answer session allowed participants to delve deeper into specific topics, including copyright laws for datasets, authorship criteria, and the implications of media monetization on archaeological sites. Participants engaged in lively discussions, exchanging perspectives and insights on various ethical and practical challenges faced in archaeological research.

The session concluded with a synthesis by the moderator, Atty. Kathleen Tantuico, highlighting the key takeaways and emphasizing the importance of collaborative, ethical research practices in addressing intellectual property issues in archaeology. Overall, the session provided a valuable platform for participants to exchange ideas, share experiences, and collectively work towards promoting responsible research practices and safeguarding cultural heritage in Southeast Asia.

Following each session, we will compile a list of useful resources related to the session topic.

The resource sheet for the Intellectual Property session of the Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia Workshop provides a carefully curated collection of valuable online resources, including links on diverse intellectual property topics relevant to archaeological research such as research concerns, data sharing practices, and authorship guidelines. These resources aim to help readers enhance their understanding and application of intellectual property principles in the field of archaeology. Click HERE to view the Session 4 Resource Sheet.

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Pre-Session 4:

Join us for the upcoming online session (Session 4) of the Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia Workshop, where we will unravel the complexities surrounding Intellectual Property in archaeology. Our objective is to foster a comprehensive understanding of the rights and responsibilities tied to archaeological findings and knowledge. Let’s engage in meaningful discussions and explore how we can collectively uphold ethical standards while preserving and sharing our archaeological heritage.

Session 4 is scheduled for 19 March 2024 at 10 am (BKK time / GMT+7) – REGISTRATION is REQUIRED* in order to join. After registering, a Zoom link will be sent. To register, please click HERE.

Meet the panel of speakers for this session:

Ben Marwick is a Professor of Archaeology at the University of Washington. His main research activities combine models from evolutionary ecology with analyses of archaeological evidence to investigate past human behaviour. His specific interests include forager technologies and ecology in Southeast Asia, Australia, and elsewhere. He also analyses how archaeology engages with local and online communities, and with popular culture. He is interested in techniques and methods for reproducible research and open science in archaeology and sciences broadly.

Noel Hidalgo Tan is the Senior Specialist in Archaeology at SEAMEO SPAFA. He is responsible for the Southeast Asian Archaeology projects and other academic programmes run by the centre, such as the SPAFA Journal. Noel also runs an internet resource page on Southeast Asian Archaeology. His research interests are in the rock art of Southeast Asia and he has published widely on the subject, particularly on the rock art of Mainland Southeast Asia where he has documented sites in Thailand, Malaysia, Laos, Cambodia and Myanmar.

Phaik Yeong Cheah is a Bioethicist and Professor of Global health at the University of Oxford, along with being a founder and current head of Bioethics and Engagement at the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Research Unit (MORU). Her research focuses on ethical issues arising in research with underserved populations, in particular how to ethically involve children, migrants, refugees and other vulnerable groups in research. Her other area of research is how to promote fair and equitable sharing of individual-level health research data, which includes how to ensure that data sharing and big data do not exacerbate existing inequalities between higher- and lower-income setting researchers.

*Please note that this session is for registered participants only and will not be live-streamed on SEAMEO SPAFA’s Facebook. No recording will be available after.

**REMINDER: This is the second last session in the Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia series, before the final workshop session which will happen on-site at Amari Bangkok Hotel on 14 June 2024 during SPAFACON 2024. If you attend the whole series, you stand the chance to have your SPAFACON 2024 registration fee (12,000 baht or approx. 340 USD) plus the 1,000 baht on-site “Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia” workshop fee WAIVED! So don’t miss out and be sure to join!

Post Session 3 – RECAP:

Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia Workshop conducted a session on Accessibility and Inclusivity of the Discipline on February 20, 2024, via Zoom from 10 AM to 12 NN (GMT+7). The session commenced with a welcome and an overview of the importance of addressing accessibility and inclusivity issues in archaeology, outlining the session’s structure, objectives, and expectations.

The central portion of the session comprised case study discussions presented by panel members Prof. Dougald O’Reilly and Prof. Ben Marwick. Dougald’s case study delved into fieldwork considerations and inclusivity, presenting a scenario where a team member faced undisclosed mental health issues affecting her ability to participate. Participants engaged in discussions and proposed practical solutions, including implementing pre-excavation forms, management training for psychological safety, a buddy system, and creating a non-penalizing environment for mental health disclosure.

Ben’s case study focused on accessible education and training, emphasizing the cultural and language challenges faced during a rock shelter excavation in northern Vietnam. Participants suggested involving local children through simple excavation activities, conducting show-and-tell rounds for community engagement, and implementing inclusive research designs that include local stakeholders.

A survey presentation, derived from a pre-session survey among participants, highlighted findings indicating that one-third of the respondents reported poor accessibility and a deterrence from pursuing careers in archaeology due to inclusivity concerns. Financial constraints, lack of training and research funding opportunities, physical accessibility, and cultural sensitivity were identified as significant factors affecting accessibility and inclusivity in the discipline of archaeology

During the sharing of experiences, participants from Southeast Asia discussed their insights into creating or encountering inclusive and accessible environments in archaeology. Examples include limited volunteer opportunities and engagement of locals in Thailand, a declining number of archaeologists in Vietnam, and the implementation of creative approaches, such as excavation boxes for children, in Indonesia

The question and answer session allowed participants to address various challenges, including accommodating persons with disabilities, collaborative efforts for excavation opportunities, and financial difficulties in archaeology careers. Accessibility of archaeological papers and knowledge, along with concerns about intentional bias, was also highlighted.

The session concluded with a synthesis by the moderator, Atty. Kathleen Tantuico, emphasizing key themes and practical solutions. The complexities of accessibility and inclusivity challenges in archaeology were underscored, with recommendations including pre-excavation forms, management training, and inclusive research designs. The collective experiences and suggestions from participants contribute to a growing awareness of the importance of making archaeology more accessible and inclusive, emphasizing the need for continued dialogue, collaboration, and practical implementations in the field.

Following each session, we will compile a list of useful resources related to the session topic.

The resource sheet for the Accessibility and Inclusivity of the Discipline session of the Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia Workshop is designed to provide readers with a carefully consolidated selection of valuable online resources. This curated material contains website links covering a variety of topics discussed during the session, offering readers easy access to relevant information and resources. These links encompass areas such as fieldwork guidelines, funding agencies, and open-access forums like journals and repositories. By exploring these resources, readers can enhance their understanding and implementation of inclusive practices in archaeology. Click HERE to view the Session 3 Resource Sheet.

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Pre-Session 3:

Join us for the third session of our Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia series. The upcoming issue delves into the Accessibility and Inclusivity of the Discipline. This session is dedicated to examining the barriers and challenges encountered by diverse groups within the discipline. The activity aims to formulate insightful recommendations that can contribute to the creation of a more inclusive and accessible environment within the Southeast Asian archaeology community.

Session 3 is scheduled for 20 February 2024 at 10 am (BKK time / GMT+7) – REGISTRATION is REQUIRED* in order to join. After registering, a Zoom link will be sent. To register, please click HERE.

Meet the panel of speakers for this session:

Ben Marwick is a Professor of Archaeology at the University of Washington. His main research activities combine models from evolutionary ecology with analyses of archaeological evidence to investigate past human behaviour. His specific interests include forager technologies and ecology in Southeast Asia, Australia, and elsewhere. He also analyses how archaeology engages with local and online communities, and with popular culture. He is interested in techniques and methods for reproducible research and open science in archaeology and sciences broadly.

Dougald O’Reilly is an Associate Professor and teaches in the School of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Australian National University. Dougald has worked in Southeast Asia since 1992. He excavated in Thailand for his PhD and has directed and co-directed projects in Cambodia and Laos in collaboration with Cambodia’s and Laos’ government bodies. His research focuses on the development of social complexity and political economy. His current research focuses on the Plain of Jars in Laos and similar jar sites in Northeast India

*Please note that this session as well as subsequent sessions are for registered participants only and will not be live-streamed on SEAMEO SPAFA’s Facebook. No recording will be available after.

**REMINDER: By attending the whole series, you stand the chance to have your SPAFACON 2024 registration fee (12,000 baht or approx. 340 USD) plus the 1,000 baht on-site “Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia” workshop fee WAIVED! So be sure to register and join!

Post Session 2 – RECAP:

The Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia Workshop held its second online session about Gender and Sex Discrimination on January 30, 2024, via Zoom. Emphasizing the importance of addressing discrimination in archaeology, the session began with an overview of participant survey results, revealing that one-third of the survey respondents faced challenges related to gender and sex discrimination. The case studies presented by Atty. Kathleen Tantuico, Dr. Michael B. C. Rivera, and Prof. Rasmi Shoocongdej explored real-world scenarios related to harassment, LGBTQ discrimination, and equal opportunity issues faced by archaeologists.

Participants engaged in in-depth discussions on various topics, including external offenders, cultural sensitivity, safe spaces, dress adaptation, age gap perceptions, and clear grievance mechanisms. Each case study prompted a thorough analysis of power dynamics, cultural considerations, gender disparities, and the importance of fostering diversity and inclusivity in archaeology.

During the Q&A, participants discussed diverse topics related to the session theme. Understanding cultural traditions, standardized definitions of conduct, and the suggested formation of a grievance committee for Southeast Asian archaeologists were highlighted. Participants also raised concerns about non-sexual harassment (e.g., hygienic issues), unaddressed instances of sexual and gender-based harassment, challenges in patriarchal societies, and the importance of safe spaces. While positive experiences related to cultural contexts and gender roles were shared, participants focused on the need for action to achieve equality and justice.

In the concluding synthesis, the moderator emphasized the significance of addressing gender and sex discrimination, summarizing key insights and proposed solutions from the case studies. The discussion recognized the impact of diverse cultural norms on power dynamics and sexual harassment, bringing attention to the need for clear standards, guidelines, and educational initiatives to address power imbalances and promote gender equality within the archaeological community.

While the workshop highlighted ongoing challenges, it also underscored the growing commitment to building a more inclusive and equitable archaeological community in Southeast Asia.

Following each session, we will compile a list of useful resources related to the session topic.

Welcome to the resource sheet for the Gender and Sex Discrimination session of the Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia Workshop. This curated collection brings together reading materials addressing the issue of gender and sex discrimination in archaeology. SEAMEO SPAFA has prepared a list of links, covering various aspects of this critical topic. Additionally, we are grateful to our participants who actively contributed by sharing more resources during our online session on January 30, 2024. Explore these materials to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges, discussions, and advancements in promoting equity within the field of archaeology. Click HERE to view the Session 2 Resource Sheet.

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Pre-Session 2:

We are excited to announce the second session of our Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia series. This session aims to shed light on issues related to Gender and Sex Discrimination within the field of archaeology and to explore ways of creating a safe and inclusive space for people of all genders and sexes.

Session 2 is scheduled for 30 January 2024 at 10 am (BKK time / GMT+7) – REGISTRATION is REQUIRED* in order to join. After registering, a Zoom link will be sent. To register, please click HERE.

Meet the panel of speakers for this session:

Kathleen Tantuico is a lawyer and archaeologist from the Philippines. She recently earned her Master of Arts in Archaeology from the University of the Philippines, School of Archaeology in July 2023, completing a thesis that dealt with the awareness of Philippine archaeologists of the laws of the Philippines relevant to the practice of archaeology. Prior to this, she obtained a Juris Doctor Degree from the University of the Philippines, College of Law in 2019 and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Sciences, specializing in Cultural Heritage, from the Ateneo de Manila University in 2010. She previously worked as a Litigation Associate at a top Philippine law firm. She has been published in both international law and archaeology journals. Currently, she serves as a Consultant for UNESCO Paris while also pursuing a Master of Law in International Law at the University of Kent.

Dr. Michael B. C. Rivera is a bioarchaeologist and anthropologist based in Hong Kong. He specializes in prehistoric coastal archaeology and the analysis of human skeletal remains. He has served on numerous association and society boards, and engaged in ethics work and conversations in the U.S., the U.K., the Netherlands, Singapore, the Philippines and Hong Kong.

Rasmi Shoocongdej is a professor and a former chair of the Department of Archaeology, at the Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University. Her research focuses on the study of the mobility organization of hunter-gatherers as one mechanism of adaptation in highly seasonal tropical environments. Her areas of specialization are late-to post-Pleistocene forager in the tropics, Southeast Asian prehistory, and cave archaeology. She is also a committee of the development of ethical guidelines for Social Science and Humanity, Ministry of Public Health and a former ethics committee of the World Archaeological Congress.

*Please note that this session as well as subsequent sessions are for registered participants only and will not be live-streamed on SEAMEO SPAFA’s Facebook  (as was done for the Opening Session). No recording will be available after.

**REMINDER: By attending the whole series, you stand the chance to have your SPAFACON 2024 registration fee (12,000 baht or approx. 340 USD) plus the 1,000 baht on-site “Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia” workshop fee WAIVED! So be sure to register and join!

Post Session 1 – RECAP:

SEAMEO SPAFA kickstarted the Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia on December 7th 2023, with the first session being the introduction to the workshop series and introduction of the panel of speakers. Dr Noel Hidalgo Tan, Senior Specialist in Archaeology at SPAFA welcomed the participants who attended the live session on Zoom and Facebook live. This workshop aims to raise awareness and encourage discussion around ethical issues in the field of Archaeology in Southeast Asia. Anne Valera, SPAFA researcher informed the participants about the hybrid format of the workshop series, where there are four online workshop: introductory session, gender and sex discrimination, inclusivity and accessibility of the discipline, and intellectual property, then followed by the case study activity and round table discussion in June 2024. The introductory session consisted of the panel of speakers presenting their perspectives on ethics and experiences in encountering ethical dilemma issues.

Kathleen Tantuico, lawyer and archaeologist from the Philippines, discussed the importance of ethics in Archaeology along with ethical guidelines in the Philippines, other countries, and regions. Tantuico emphasised that with the different standards about ethics around the world, archaeology communities should create the standard guidelines to maintain integrity in the discipline.

Dr Michael B.C. Rivera, bioarchaeologist and anthropologist also shared experiences and perspectives from working in the UK, the US, Singapore, the Netherlands and Hong Kong about ethics in the field of Archaeology. He highlighted the power dynamic and the importance in protecting and supporting each other to push the ethical practices in Archaeology. Dr Rivera noted that the idea of ethics can be different depending on the context and ethics can change regularly. He emphasised that creating a safe and supportive discipline is relevant for the development of the discipline.

Prof. Rasmi Shoocongdej, Archaeology professor at Silpakorn University, Thailand, noted that Archaeology can be viewed in positive and negative ways. Therefore she stressed the importance of communication and collaboration when practising Archaeology as it is crucial to understand, respect and protect the local heritage and the local communities.

Prof. Ben Marwick, of the University of Washington, presented several ways to define and approach ethics. He suggested that at a regional level, surveys can be used to determine the important principles and priorities in updating ethical guidelines regularly.

Assoc. Prof. Dougald O’Reilly, of the Australian National University, discussed the definition of being ethical and that ethics in each society can represent the social norms. Dr. O’Reilly shared approaches to be ethical in the profession of Archaeology including his experiences encountering ethical dilemmas in practising Archaeology.

Prof. Phaik Yeong Cheah, bioethicist and Professor of Global Health at the University of Oxford, emphasised the importance of collaboration and how practitioners can learn from each other to further develop the ethical guidelines and practices, including the relevance of open research in the times of crisis.

The session continued with a Question and Answer session where the panel fielded questions from  the participants. 

Following each session, we will compile a list of useful resources related to the session topic.

For Session 1, we have compiled a list of archaeology-related codes of ethics from various institutions and organizations, offering valuable insights for archaeologists, researchers, and students. Gain a deeper understanding of responsible and ethical conduct within the field by exploring diverse perspectives and guidelines. Click HERE.

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Pre-Session 1:
Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia series is about to begin!
 
The Opening Session on 7 December 2023 at 10 am (BKK time / GMT+7) is open to all by joining on Zoom via this link, HERE. It will also be live-streamed on SEAMEO SPAFA’s Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/seameo.spafa/). During the opening session, attendees will get an overview of the Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia series (4 ONLINE and 1 ONSITE during SPAFACON 2024) and meet the knowledgeable resource speakers specializing in ethical matters within Southeast Asian Archaeology.
 
Subsequent sessions will be conducted privately, exclusively for registered participants so be sure to register. To register, click HERE.
 
*And don’t forget: By attending the WHOLE SERIES, you stand the chance to have your SPAFACON 2024 registration fee (12,000 baht or approx. 340 USD) plus the 1,000 baht on-site “Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia” workshop fee WAIVED! So be sure to register and join!

Responses from the 2019 SEAMEO SPAFA Regional Survey on Archaeology Education indicated a demand for greater awareness surrounding ethical issues in archaeology. One of the responses to the need will be a seminar series to highlight some of these issues in the region today, to raise awareness of ethics in the profession, and also to discuss ways to resolve or mitigate prevalent issues.

One of the knowledge gaps identified by several respondents to the survey indicated a need for more awareness about ethical issues or ethical malpractice in archaeology in Southeast Asia. Some of the problems identified in contemporary archaeological practice include access to opportunities and resources for local archaeologists, gender discrimination and sexual harassment, and control over intellectual property. Ethical issues can be attributed to a lack of knowledge (ignorance), illegal or immoral action, or differences in cultural practice that may lead to injustice, tension or unfair outcomes.

Discussions on ethics in archaeology are generally not discussed or widely known in the region. Curating a number of seminars around specific topics may help raise awareness of these issues and find ways to resolve them.

  • Promote ethical practice in archaeology in Southeast Asia
  • Identify issues of concern in archaeological practice in Southeast Asia
  • Facilitate workable solutions where possible, including providing perspectives and solutions from outside Southeast Asia
  • Ethics in Archaeology case study activity – to foster critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and collaboration among participants while simulating real-life scenarios archaeologists might encounter

Online Seminar – Lecture sessions

A group of knowledgeable resource speakers specialising in ethical matters within Southeast Asian Archaeology (where possible) will conduct four lecture sessions. These sessions will cover issues of gender and sex discrimination (including harassment), accessibility and inclusivity of the discipline (including but not limited to ableism and ageism), as well as intellectual property. Following the lectures, the ethical issues identified will be further refined and addressed through a moderated discussion where participants share their encounters and concerns.

The opening session will be live-streamed on SPAFA’s Facebook account. The subsequent three sessions will be conducted privately, exclusively for registered participants.

Workshop and Case Study Activity

There will be a culminating workshop and activity scheduled to take place during SPAFACON 2024. In the morning session, there will be a case study activity where selected participants, divided into teams, will present a strategic plan for a fictional case study, the details of which they will receive during the final online seminar session in March 2024. The assessment of these presentations will be carried out by the moderator and the invited advisory panel. The afternoon session will consist of roundtable dialogue, question-and-answer discussion, and deliberations about future actions. Interested individuals can pay to join the morning and afternoon sessions.

Ethics in Archaeology Case Study Activity: Mechanics

Objective:
The Ethics in Archaeology Case Study Activity aims to test participants’ knowledge of ethical guidelines, laws, and their ability to address complex ethical dilemmas in the field of archaeology. Participants will work in teams to analyze a fictional case study, develop a strategic plan, and present their solutions to a panel of judges.

Team Formation:

  1. Eligible participants will be paired up in March, following the final online session.

Case Study Development:

  1. The moderator will provide a fictional case study to the teams. The case study is developed using input from real-life experiences and suggestions from academics, legal experts, and archaeologists from Southeast Asia.
  2. The case study will present a complex ethical dilemma that archaeologists might encounter during fieldwork, research, or interactions with stakeholders and local communities.

Activity Phases:

  1. Analysis and Planning:

– The teams will have three months (March to June 2024) to understand the case study and develop a strategic plan thoroughly.

– Teams will discuss the case study and identify ethical dilemmas, potential stakeholders, relevant laws, and ethical guidelines.

– Teams will create a strategic plan that addresses the ethical dilemmas and outlines their proposed solutions. The plan should consider the perspectives of archaeologists, local communities, and stakeholders.

  1. Presentation and Defense:

– Each team will present their strategic plan to the panel of judges and other participants. Presentations should be clear, concise, and well-structured.

– Teams will defend their solutions by explaining the reasoning behind their choices, referencing academic knowledge, ethical guidelines, laws, and personal experiences.

– Judges may ask questions to challenge teams and assess their ability to think critically and adapt their solutions to new scenarios.

  1. Question and Answer Session:

– After each presentation, the judges and audience will engage in a question-and-answer session with the team. This session may involve follow-up questions, hypothetical scenarios, and challenges to the team’s proposed solutions.

Judging Criteria:

Judges will evaluate teams based on the following criteria:

– Ethical Understanding:  How well the team comprehends and analyzes the ethical dilemmas presented in the case study.

– Solution Quality: The feasibility, practicality, and effectiveness of the proposed strategic plan in addressing the ethical issues.

– Legal and Ethical Knowledge: The team’s ability to reference relevant laws, ethical guidelines, and academic knowledge in their solutions.

– Stakeholder Consideration: The extent to which the team considers the perspectives of stakeholders, local communities, and heritage preservation in their solutions.

– Presentation and Defense: Clarity, organization, and persuasiveness of the presentation and the team’s responses to judges’ questions.

Winner Selection:

Judges will deliberate and score each team’s performance based on the judging criteria. The team with the highest overall score will be declared the winner and receive the prizes.

We are delighted for you to join us for this engaging and informative event, where we will explore the intricate and essential aspects of ethics in archaeology within the context of Southeast Asia.

Please fill out the application form to secure your spot and be a part of Archaeology Ethics in Southeast Asia workshop: https://bit.ly/ArchaeologyEthicsInSEAsiaWorkshop

For inquiries, please contact anne@seameo-spafa.org.

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